mold remediation

Mold Remediation FAQs

What Is Mold Remediation? The word “mold” is enough to strike fear into any homeowner. However, microscopic mold spores exist in almost every environment, indoors or outdoors. Mold remediation involves eliminating harmful mold growth — which is typically the kind of growth you can see and smell. Is There a Difference Between Mold Removal and…

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What is Asbestos?

Asbestos was once considered a “wonder material” in the world of building. Today, it’s a hidden danger for many homes and commercial buildings. Asbestos is the commercial name used for a group of naturally-occurring, fibrous silicate minerals. It’s easy to mine and found all over the world. The most valuable property of asbestos is its…

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What is Black Mold?

The very idea of having black mold strikes terror into the hearts of homeowners everywhere. But what exactly is black mold? Interestingly, black mold isn’t just one type of mold. It’s a label applied to many different types of fungus. But stachybotrys chartarum is the species we tend to call black mold. This particular mold…

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What to Do If Your House Floods

When it comes to flooding, Mother Nature has not been kind during the past few years. Millions of homes across America are affected by urban flooding due to increased rains and the resulting overflow from rivers, streams, and coastal areas. But Americans face another type of emergency flooding—from inside their homes. The most common cause…

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Electrical Fire

How to Prevent Electrical Fires

According to the National Fire Protection Association, electrical fires were involved in an average of 47,820 reported home structure fires from 2007–2011. Almost half (48 percent) of home structure electrical fires involve some type of electrical distribution equipment, such as wiring, outlets, switches, lamps, light bulbs, cords or plugs. Not only are electrical fires dangerous,…

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Common Causes of House Fires

  According to statistics from the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), there are more than 350,000 home fires each year in the U.S., leading to more than 2,600 deaths. Fires can be started in a number of ways, but they generally fall into one of two categories: fires caused by heat igniting combustible materials, and…

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